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The Capri Agile Academy

The Capri Agile Academy has now gone live.

We are very excited to announce that the Capri Agile Academy is now active, offering anyone around the globe access to a comprehensive portfolio of options to match whatever their needs may be, whether it be pertaining to Agile, Lean, Scrum, whether its a starter course or a refresher course.
The academy is run by a team of expert Agile coaches with years of extensive hands-on practical experience, and an unrivaled knowledge of specific real world problems you’re likely to face, as well as their solutions.
The academy offers 10 courses, available both online and for private classes/workshops.

To find out more, click here.

Get in touch:
T: 0333-200-7257
E: info@capriconsulting.co.uk
W: www.capriconsulting.co.uk

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The new courses…

FDP-ComputerTraining

 

Our next courses have just been announced, and are set to sell quickly:

23/05/2015 – Agile Master Class

30/05/2015 – User Story Writing 

Book either of these course now and receive a 10% discount using the code CAPTWT10. A further 10% of all booking fees will be donated to the Nepal Earthquake Appeal. Book here.

 

Capri’s Agile Masterclass is specifically designed to accelerate experienced Agile practitioners to a new level, led by Agile guru Krishna Thakur.
Using a mixture of discussion, instruction and exploration you will learn new techniques for development and testing, operations, automation and team dynamics, as well as working with legacy systems and integrating with third parties. Using these techniques you and your teams will deliver business solutions faster than they thought possible.

In a business, it is very important that the work being produced is well organised and priortised efficiently in order for it to be delivered at a high standard. Capri Consulting offers a specialist course in writing User Stories that can help you manage your work into smaller chunks to create tangible value.
User Stories helps us manage requirements. Their primary job is to define the value a user gains from the system. Since User Stories focus on the underlying Agile values of collaboration and Just-In-Time definition, it makes them a good Agile tool. User Stories are small narrative texts (2-3 sentences) in everyday/business language of the end user of a system. These capture what the user does, or needs to do as a part of his/her job function.

 

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Capri to donate 10% of all proceeds to Nepal Earthquake Appeal

 

On the 25th April at 11:56 NST a 7.8 Magnitude earthquake hit Nepal, which devastated the nation and its people, killing over 7,000 people and injuring nearly 15,000. 3 million people have been left starving and in need of food, 130,000 houses have been destroyed, 24,000 people are living in makeshift shanty towns and 1000’s of children have been separated from their families.

To try and aid the millions in need and support the charity workers who travelled from around the world to help, Capri will be donating 10% of all of its training course proceeds for the whole of May to the Nepal Earthquake appeal – this includes our Agile Master Class beginning on the 23rd and our User Story Writing workshop on the 30th.

View our courses and register here.

Even if you’re not booking a course with us, please donate to the appeal anyway; people need your help. You can donate here.

Thank you.

 

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Scrum team failing consistently?

We love firefighters! Don’t we? They are Heroes! But not in software development. In any Scrum software development, very few teams actually manage to find the time to refine and properly compose their stories (user requirements). Because of this, they’re constantly taking time to try and analyse the software requirements during the projects sprints.

This inevitably results in stories being rushed, ill defined, slapdash and careless. This delays the development of the software and  testing, which  should be a major activities, is compressed and squashed into just the last one or two days of the sprint.

And the result?scrum

Firfighting !!!!

The result, is of course, defect in the code. The team then starts firefighting, to try and fix the problems that were born of their ill planning. However, because they’re so caught up in their self-imposed firefighting, they don’t have time to analyse and create competent stories for the next sprint, so they dive right back into the vicious cycle of firefighting.

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New to Agile?

In short, agile and lean are general concepts, the former basing on Agile Manifesto and the latter on Toyota Production System. Then we have Scrum or XP, built over agile, and Kanban, built over lean, which are specific methods teams can implement, like Prince2.

Personally, I don’t treat agile and lean movements in a very orthodox way — they base on the same principles. So, to some point, they’re overlapping. Also, you will find teams mixing methods from both houses, Scrumban (a combination of Scrum and Kanban) being probably the most common.

If you wanted to position agile/lean methods somehow I’d say that:

  • Scrum is the closest to the old-school project management methods, although it doesn’t really deal with formal side of project management.
  • XP focuses on engineering practices and is generally programmer-centered.
  • Kanban is often dubbed change management framework as it doesn’t change the way team works on the day 1 and lets the process evolve over time.
  • As all three focuses on different things, it isn’t uncommon to see them, or their parts, used jointly.

If you want to learn more I’d start with such set of materials:

  • Introduction to Scrum on Mike Cohn’s site. If you want more on Scrum Mike Cohn’s site is a good place to find also more advanced stuff on Scrum.
  • Once you know what Scrum is I’d strongly recommend Henrik Kniberg’s and Mattias Skarin’s minibook Kanban and Scrum – Making most of both which is great in terms of describing Kanban but has a lot of referrals to Scrum.
  • For more advanced stuff on Kanban I’d recommend Limited WIP Society articles (topic for my next blog).
  • Good kick start on XP can be found on Ron Jeffries’ site.

In terms of books as a kick start, I’d recommend:

  • Mike Cohn’s Succeeding with Agile for Scrum
  • Kent Beck’s Extreme Programming Explained for XP
  • David Anderson’s Kanban for Kanban

If it is too much of a hassle to read these books and digest then contact us and we may be able to help you.